Tuesday, 13 June 2017

LGBT persecution: The case of Uganda

June holds many Pride events across the globe where it is permissible. In many places, it simply isn't. LGBT today continue to be one of the most persecuted minority groups on the planet. Even in places where rights have advanced significantly, like in the United States, LGBT persons continue to suffer both de facto and de jure persecution. Since the election of Donald Trump, homicides against LGBT are up 17%, excluding the horrific Pulse nightclub massacre that happened one year ago. Politicians continue to introduce laws designed to marginalize and discriminate against LGBT Americans and other places in the world.

When political leaders promote agendas of hate, there are real consequences. Take the situation in Uganda and the tragic death of human rights activist David Kato.


Life imprisonment for “carnal knowledge against the order of nature.” Seven years for “gross indecency.” In February 2014, Ugandan president Yoweri Museveni signed the Anti-Homosexuality Act, broadening the criminalization of same-sex relations, which had already been illegal since British colonial rule. You didn’t have to be in Uganda to be punished – the law contained provisions for Ugandans to be extradited, should they be caught violating this law abroad. You didn’t even have to be gay, as the act included penalties for those who aided or abetted same-sex acts, whether the “aid” came from individuals, companies, or NGOs.

A February 2011 leak of US diplomatic cables revealed US concerns about the worsening human rights situation in Uganda and discussed a UN funded conference held in 2009 during which David Kato, considered the father of Uganda’s LGBT activism, gave an impassioned speed regarding the anti-LGBT atmosphere in his country. MP David Bahati followed with a tirade against homosexuality, which received massive applause.

Bahati, described in the US cables as a man whose homophobia is “blinding and incurable,” authored the Anti-Homosexuality Act, which originally called for LGBT Ugandans to be put to death. Uganda is not the only African country to criminalize homosexuality; thirty-eight of 53 African nations have laws on the books that punish homosexuality in some way. However, Uganda’s law was considered particularly severe, reflecting a climate in which an overwhelming majority of Ugandans disapprove of homosexuality and LGBT citizens suffer violence, vandalism, discrimination, and “correctional” rape.

And death.

On 26 January 2011, David Kato was bludgeoned to death with a hammer in his own home. Some weeks earlier, he had won a court case against a tabloid that had pictured Kato and another man on the cover with the headline, “Hang them.” The tabloid had been publishing lists of names and addresses of Ugandans who were rumored to be gay; it was responsible for some of the persecution as those identified in the lists were harassed, discriminated against, detained, and beaten. Kato and other activists had seen increased harassment since a high court judge granted a permanent injunction against the tabloid to prevent it from identifying gay people. 

While Kato paid the ultimate price for his fight to protect LBGT Ugandans from the scourge of bigotry and human rights advocates across the globe mourned his death, the environment did not improve. Three years later, the Anti-Homosexuality Act was signed into law. Uganda saw an immediate spike in human rights abuses following its enactment. Human rights group Sexual Minorities of Uganda (SMUG) published a report documenting 162 cases of persecution against LGBT Ugandans in May 2014 alone. LGBT Ugandans suffered violence at the hands of authorities and private citizens, evictions, employment termination, denial of health care, destruction of property, family banishment, and social stigma that continued well after the Constitutional Court of Uganda struck down the law in August 2014. The SMUG report, entitled, “And that’s how I survived being killed: Testimonies of human rights abuses from Uganda’s sexual and gender minorities,” found 264 cases of persecution from May 2014-December 2015.

Sadly, the Uganda situation hasn't improved. In fact, one has to wonder if the climate of hate that is spreading across the globe hasn't emboldened other would be LGBT killers in Uganda and elsewhere. Let us hope this is not the case.


In too many countries, to be Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, or Transgender is to be stigmatized or even treated as criminal. LGBT individuals need online access to healthcare, social networks, support and advocacy, without the worry of a digital trail. SumRando VPN, Web Proxy, and Messenger allow these individuals to maintain their anonymity and security when accessing the internet and communicating online.

We want to help you survive.

Thursday, 8 June 2017

Notes on the Underground

"I self publish."

Such an empowering word. "Samizdat." The idea seems quaint in the digital age, but the need for such underground communication is as important as ever. We are witnessing a global backsliding in democracy at a rather alarming rate; even the world's staunchest proponents of human rights and ideals are experiencing existential threats to their institutions the world once strove to live up to.

The demonization, detention, and even death of journalists has become far too widespread. 2016 was one of the worst years for journalists that we've seen in many years, led by Erdogen's regime in Turkey, who arrested 81 media workers in 2016, often shuttering media outlets with it, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists.

And what role has the global adoption of the internet played in the world's slide toward authoritarianism? How can you quantify it? The proliferation of amateur outlets purporting to report the news without the education and professional training necessary to verify facts, identify and assemble a portfolio of trustworthy sources and recognize those who would seek to disseminate false information, and even refrain from kneejerk reactions and personal opinions when inappropriate, has contributed to a global climate of conspiracy theories, "alternative facts," "fake news," and a host of other misinformation events.

The Soviet Union was, at times, one of the most heinous empires in human history, as most non-authoritarian-inclined people would agree. Censorship, of course, was an inherent part of the regimes power. Indeed, without censorship, such a regime could not exist!

It's why the samizdat existed, too, but to fight it. Russian poet Nikolay Glazkov coined the term as a joke (showing that comedy always sides with the resistance.) His father was repressed as part of Stalin's Great Purge. Consequently, Glazkov was expelled from university for being related to "an enemy of the people."

LOL. The only enemies of the people are those who seek to oppress the people.

In Moscow, Glazkov worked odd jobs and printed poetry under the publishing house name "Samsebyaizdat" (self-publishing house), clearly a knock against state-run publishing houses. He later shortened the word.

Glazkov may have used the term as a joke, but the samizdat were no joking matter. They were an essential tool to dissidents, who reproduced censored and banned material by hand and passed it from reader to reader. Harsh punishments were doled out to those caught with censored material, so the practice was highly dangerous. Boris Pasternik's Nobel Prize winning Doctor Zhivago was the first full length book to be passed around by samizdat. Samizdat covered a wide range of topics, from political and literary texts to nationalist and religious works.

It is hard for many of us to fathom having to pass around ideas like that, on papers that are passed around, sometimes to the point of disintegration. Today, we have encryption that works the same way as the samizdat. While the Soviets had prying eyes looking for people who were passing documents around, Putin's regime has prying eyes reading what Russians and others write on the internet. What we have seen today in the United States shows just how far reaching is Russian cybercrime and cyberwarfare. It can affect the stability of countries.

That is why encryption is so vital. Using SumRando Cybersecurity products will mask what data you are transmitting, making sure that Putin isn't intercepting your communications. We offer a VPN for internet browsing, Messenger for communicating, and STASH for transferring files anonymously.

Visit https://sumrando.com today to learn more.

Wednesday, 10 May 2017

Digital Divide: World Cyber Alerts - May 10, 2017


Wait For It - Change Is Coming to SumRando!


Policy
their legislation today could be yours tomorrow

Rwandan flag and map



A new Rwandan draft law has established the National Cyber Security Authority (NCSA). The Bill intends to protect private and government information from cyberattacks and cybercrime. 



Kenyan flag and map



Kenya expects the president will sign a Computer and Cybercrime Bill into law before 2018. The Bill will address illegal online access, online fraud, money laundering, phishing, cyber-stalking and child abuse. 



Australian flag and map 

New metadata retention laws in Australia are sending many internet users straight to their nearest VPN. Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and telco companies are now required to collect and retain customer metadata, including personal information and mode, location, and length of communication. 

Russian flag and map


A draft Russian bill hopes to block anonymous proxies and VPN services that continue to provide access to forbidden websites. Currently, 100 ban-bypassing resources are blocked in Russia. 






Privacy, Surveillance, and Censorship
government isn't always on your side

American flag and map 

The United States’ Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has revealed that it can share encrypted data regarding terrorists and criminals with India via the internet. “Sometimes, the data comes in months or years, and sometimes, by the time we approach the authorities there, private companies don’t keep backup, or it is not possible to decrypt everything on the internet,” clarified a National Investigation Agency official. 

Israeli flag and map 


Israel’s NSO Group is thought to be responsible for the Chrysaor malware. The malware is an adaptation of Pegasus and is used to spy on Android phones. 


Turkish flag and map 



Turkey recently blocked access to Wikipedia, in protest of the online encyclopedia’s inclusion of articles that link Ankara to terrorism. Wikipedia founder Jimmy Wales countered the decision: “Access to information is a fundamental human right. Turkish people, I will always stand with you to fight for this right.” 



Research and Initiatives
making your world a more cybersecure place

British flag and map 

In a European first, the United Kingdom’s Cardiff University has launched the Centre of Excellence in Cyber Security Analytics. In conjunction with Airbus, the center will study machine learning, data analytics and artificial intelligence.





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Thursday, 20 April 2017

Digital Divide: World Cyber Alerts - April 20, 2017


Change Is Coming to SumRando - Stay Tuned!


Policy
their legislation today could be yours tomorrow

American flag and map


New United States legislation has prompted Americans everywhere to turn to VPNs to protect their ISPs: “We saw a noticeable increase [in downloads] around the time Congress was considering the bill until the time Trump signed it,” reported Caleb Chen of London Trust Media. Internet Service Providers (ISPs) are now free to collect and resell personal and browsing data to ad targeters and data brokers alike.





Privacy, Surveillance and Censorship
government isn't always on your side

American flag and map


The United States’ National Security Agency (NSA) has penetrated the SWIFT banking network and monitored various Middle East banks, according to anonymous hacker Shadow Brokers. The released files reveal vulnerabilities in several Microsoft Windows products.




Iranian flag and map


The Iranian government is requiring “Telegram channels with more than 5,000 followers to register with the country’s Culture Ministry.” The block of the encrypted messaging app precedes upcoming national elections; between 16,000 and 20,000 Telegram channels were blocked each week in March.

Ugandan flag and map




Ugandan academic and activist Stella Nyanzi has been charged with cyber-harassment. Her crime? Labeling President Yoweri Museveni a “pair of buttocks” on Facebook. According to her lawyer, “Dr. Nyanzi is within her constitutional rights and we are for an all-out legal battle with the state to defend her rights.”





Research and Initiatives
making your world a more cybersecure place

Malaysian flag and map


Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak has asked social media activists to defend the government via cyberspace: “We have long been in defensive mode. Enough. It is now time to attack,” reads a post on najibrazak.com.



German flag and map



Germany’s Cyber-Security Council and Israel’s Checkmarx have opened a joint international chapter. “Cyber threats are not bound to national borders, so that transnational cooperation and networking is inevitable for the exchange of know-how and best practices,” acknowledged Council president Philipp von Saldern.







All images credit of BOLDG/Shutterstock.com.
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Tuesday, 28 March 2017

Digital Divide: World Cyber Alerts - March 27, 2017


Privacy, Surveillance and Censorship
government isn't always on your side

American flag and map


Foreign governments have the right to spy on Americans by remote control, says a United States Court of Appeals decision. The verdict was in response to the case of Kidane v. Ethiopia, in which Mr. Kidane was monitored by the Ethiopian government in his United States home via computer malware. 

Kenyan flag and map


Privacy International has found that Kenyan security agencies are violating privacy rights and committing human rights abuses. “Telecommunications operators end up handing over their customers’ data because they largely feel that they cannot decline agencies’ requests, in part due to the vagueness in the law,” acknowledged the report. 




Research and Initiatives
making your world a more cybersecure place

Mexican flag and map 

Singaporean flag and map Microsoft is opening a cybersecurity center in Mexico. “By opening this Cyber Security Center, we are offering our clients protection from attacks and security risks, as well as ways to detect them and find solutions,” noted Jorge Silva of Microsoft Mexico. 







The National University of Singapore now has a cybersecurity facility, which aims to provide a “realistic environment” for research and testing. 

British flag and map



The United Kingdom’s GCHQ recently held a cybersecurity summit in response to fears a Russian hack would interfere with the country’s upcoming election. Of particular concern were the security of internal emails and databases of voters’ political views.






All images credit of BOLDG/Shutterstock.com.
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Wednesday, 22 February 2017

SumTips: How to Bring Back Cameroon's Internet

Cameroonian flag and map
Step One: Read Access Now’s open letter to telecommunications companies in Cameroon on the internet shutdown.
“The internet shutdown in Cameroon’s anglophone regions has been continuing for a month and has significantly interfered with citizens’ daily lives. By blocking access to information and services, the disruption thwarts the exercise of human rights, including the freedoms of expression and association, and slows economic development, seriously harming the innovative businesses dependent on your services. We estimate the shutdown has already cost more than US$1.39 million and grows daily.”

Step Two: Know the open letter’s recommendations.
We recommend that [telecommunications companies]:
1.    Publicly denounce the shutdown and the harm it has caused to your customers and your company’s economic and reputational interests;
2.    Detail the geographic scope and technical implementation of the blocking;
3.    Reveal the demand from the government that required you to block internet access, and any gag order or other pressure to conceal the demand; and
4.    Jointly push back against the government demand, through all legal and policy tools at your disposal, in order to restore internet access.

Step Three: Sign Avaaz’s #BringBackOurInternet petition.
“As citizens from Cameroon and around the world, we call you to sanction the government of Cameroon until they restore internet for all it’s citizens. We condemn the actions by President Biya to shutdown the internet in anglophone areas of the country and repress freedom of expression. The United Nations considers internet shutdowns as a violation of the international human rights law, we need you to respond and act for the respect of human rights.”
Be an advocate, surf secure and stay Rando!



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Digital Divide: World Cyber Alerts - February 21, 2017


Policy
their legislation today could be yours tomorrow

Chinese flag and map 

The Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) has announced that it will create a commission to establish cybersecurity policies and reviews. Internet products and services that affect national security or the public interest will be subject to a security review. 





Research and Initiatives
making your world a more cybersecure place

Indian flag and map 

India's Software Freedom Law Centre now maintains an online Internet Shutdown Tracker. Says the organization, "We aim to stand strong with the message that the information superhighway that is the Internet is essential for the holistic socio-economic and cultural development of the country. #KeepItOn." 

South African flag and map



IBM’s Digital-Nation Africa is launching in South Africa, Kenya, Nigeria, Morocco and Egypt. The project aims to prepare individuals for careers in cybersecurity, data science, artificial intelligence and cloud computing

Israeli flag and map

Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University and Israel’s Ben-Gurion University of the Negev have formed a joint project known as the Bio-Inspired Agile Cyber Security Assurance Framework (BICSAF). Professor Lam Khin Yong reported the project “will be able to develop innovative methods for combating one of the most complicated problems in cyber security – Advanced Persistent Threats (APTs).” 

Finnish flag and map 



Finland, a country known for its internet security, will open a cybersecurity hub in Helsinki this year. The center will work to stop cyberwarfare threats and will involve the cooperation of the United States, Germany, Spain, the United Kingdom, Sweden, Poland and the Baltic States. 




Cyberattacks
the threats we all face

Kenyan flag and map


Cybercrime cost Kenya Sh17.7 billion, or .28% of its GDP, in 2016, the highest of all African countries. The east African nation is ranked as the 69th most vulnerable country in the Global Threat Index. 

Turkish flag and map



Lion Soldiers Team, a Turkish hacking group, has claimed responsibility for an attack that disrupted the website of the Austrian parliament. On Facebook, the group announced, “Our reaction will be harsh in response to this racism of Austria against Muslims!!! (Parliament down.).” 

Japanese flag and map




Japan experienced a record-setting 128.1 billion cyberattacks in 2016. The highest number of attacks from any single country came from China. 





Looking Back
a new glimpse at past alerts

American flag and map 

An unsigned United States cybersecurity executive order has been revised to reflect a more moderate agenda: “Much of this quite literally could have been written by the Obama administration,” reported Paul Rosenzweig, a former member of the Department of Homeland Security. Whether or when President Trump will sign the revamped executive order remains uncertain. 





All images credit of BOLDG/Shutterstock.com.
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Tuesday, 14 February 2017

SumTips: Where Art Is Under Attack

Iranian flag and map
Independent organization Freemuse, or Freedom of Musical Expression, recently released “Art Under Threat”, a 46-page report on censorship and attacks on artistic expression in 2016. The results reveal that freedom of expression for artists is a global concern, with 1,028 attacks occurring in 78 countries worldwide. Top offenders include:

6 Serious Violators:
 
1.    Iran: Artists are often charged with and sentenced for “insulting the sacred”, “propaganda against the state” or “spreading depravity”. Iranian courts use the “assembly line” method for prosecuting artists and other citizens, and barbaric methods, such as lashing, to punish convicts. On 5 November 2016, Iranian singer Amir Tataloo was sentenced to five years in prison and 74 lashes after being found guilty of ‘spreading Western immorality’.”

2.    Turkey: “The attempted coup against President Erdo─čan on 15 July 2016 and the following State of Emergency led to a clampdown on oppositional voices in Turkey hitting media, academia and the arts world hard, literally silencing and imprisoning tens of thousands of people.”

3.    Egypt: “Article 65 in Egypt’s 2014 constitution grants citizens the right to express their opinions verbally, in writing, through imagery, or by any other means of expression and publication. Another article guarantees freedom of artistic and literary creativity stating that “the state shall encourage arts and literature, sponsor creative artists and writers and protect their productions, and provide the means necessary for achieving this end”. However, Egypt’s legislation still allows for the jailing of artists and citizens on the charge of ‘contempt of religion’.”

4.    Nigeria: “Artists face a complex system of censorship carried out by a variety of actors, further complicated by multiple censorship boards. In addition to the national censorship boards, states such as Kano in the North and Lagos in the South even have their own censorship boards, with the consequence that artists and cultural producers of these states face double censorship mechanisms.”

5.    China: “In China, legal bodies are not separated from political institutions and opinions considered in opposition with the government and country’s “One China” policy are not allowed. Censorship of arts, media and academia is widespread. “Objectionable” content, including references to controversial Chinese historical details, Chinese politics, details about Chinese leaders, sexually explicit material and, in some instances, material relating to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) issues are not allowed.”

6.    Russia: “Nationalism and political allegiance also continue to drive what type of art is allowed on stage and in halls, or what is funded by state coffers. Plays are vetted and cancelled for their political and moral content and artists are blacklisted for their political views on issues such as the Russia-Ukraine conflict.”

Top 10 Countries for ‘Serious Violations’—killings, abductions, attacks, imprisonments, prosecutions, persecutions and threats:

1.    Iran: 30 serious violations
2.    Turkey: 23 serious violations
3.    Egypt: 18 serious violations
4.    Nigeria: 15 serious violations
5.    China: 14 serious violations
6.    Russia: 10 serious violations
7.    Syria: 4 serious violations
8.    Malaysia: 4 serious violations
9.    Tanzania: 4 serious violations
10.   Uzbekistan: 4 serious violations

Top 10 Countries for Acts of Censorship:
1.    Ukraine: 557 censorship violations
2.    Kuwait: 61 censorship violations
3.    China: 20 censorship violations
4.    Egypt: 19 censorship violations
5.    India: 17 censorship violations
6.    Russia: 16 censorship violations
7.    Turkey: 13 censorship violations
8.    United States: 13 censorship violations
9.    Pakistan: 11 censorship violations
10.  Iran: 9 censorship violations

Support the arts, surf secure and stay Rando!



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Friday, 10 February 2017

Digital Divide: World Cyber Alerts - February 10, 2017


Policy
their legislation today could be yours tomorrow

American flag and map


After much talk of efforts to enhance United States government cybersecurity capabilities, United States President Donald Trump did not follow through on signing a cybersecurity overhaul executive order. The event marks the second time in a week that the president has neglected to sign an executive action. 




Privacy, Surveillance and Censorship
when government isn't on your side

Egyptian flag and map 


The Egyptian Initiative for Personal Rights (EIPR) and Citizen Lab have concluded that Egyptian human rights groups are being targeted by an Egyptian intelligence agency phishing campaign. Those targeted are NGOs accused by the government of receiving illegal foreign funding. 




Research and Initiatives
making your world a more cybersecure place

Indonesian flag and map


Australia and Indonesia have agreed to fight terrorism through strengthened mutual cybersecurity. Political, Legal and Security Affairs Minister Wiranto of Indonesia noted that he expects “tighter and stronger cooperation in law and security.” 

Ghanaian flag and map

ISACA, an association previously known as the Information Systems Audit and Control Association, will host information technology and cybersecurity events in the African countries of Egypt and Ghana this year. The Best of Cybersecurity Nexus (CSX) will take place in Cairo in July; the Africa Computer Audit, Control and Security (CACS) will be held in Accra in September. 




Cyberattacks
the threats we all face

Russian flag and mapThe United States Treasury Department is allowing new cybersecurity transactions with the Russian Federal Security Service. According to the Russian Duma’s Nikolai Kovalyov, “This shows that actual joint work on establishing an anti-terrorism coalition is about to begin,” but United States Representative Eric Swalwell had different ideas: “This is the same group that, just a month ago, our intelligence community determined was responsible for the attack on our democracy. We just made it easier for the same group to import into Russia the tools they could use to hack us or our allies again.”

Looking Back
a new glimpse at past alerts

Chinese flag and map 


#TurnOnVPN has countered concerns that all VPN usage is now illegal in China. According to the non-partisan organization, Chinese businesses are forbidden from using VPNs, but individuals are not





All images credit of BOLDG/Shutterstock.com.
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Thursday, 9 February 2017

SumTips: 4 Digital Activists You Should Know

Activist fist and pencilIt’s February, which means the 2017 Index on Censorship Freedom of Expression Awards are right around the corner. This week, the shortlist of nominees was announced in four categories: arts, campaigning, digital activism and journalism. Featured below are the nominees for digital activism, recognized “for innovative uses of technology to circumvent censorship and enable free and independent exchange of information”.
  • Jensiat: a (heavily censored) Iranian online graphic novel that offers accessible sexual health and cybersecurity awareness and provides access to verified digital security resources. According to Jensiat’s creators, “Our interactions with readers leads us to believe they have picked up what we’ve been discussing, and are incorporating them into their online lives.”
  • Bill Marczak: Marczak’s Bahrain Watch promotes accountable and transparent governance by investigating and running campaigns in response to activists’ social media posts. Said Marczak, “There’s many an activist who face serious risks from their government of being beaten up or being tortured just because they express opinions. I think that’s unacceptable and that’s one of the things I am trying to prevent.”
  • Evan Mawarire: When Pastor Mawarire expressed his displeasure with the Zimbabwean government by posting a video of himself draped in the country’s flag, people listened. More than eight million people joined a government boycott in response. Explained Mawarire, “I called the campaign #ThisFlag because it encouraged citizens to get involved in reclaiming national pride by condemning the shameless actions of government and its officials.”
  • Turkey Blocks: an Alp Toker-led team that monitors, reports on and investigates internet restrictions in Turkey. Turkey Blocks’ successful tools have begun to be utilized elsewhere. Reported Alp Toker, “Our alerts, issued within minutes of detection, have helped Turkish citizens to stay online when shutdowns get implemented and provided the media with enough confidence to report assertively on digital censorship in Turkey.”
Index on Censorship will celebrate the award recipients at a gala on April 19.

Thank an activist, surf secure and stay Rando!





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Thursday, 2 February 2017

Digital Divide: World Cyber Alerts - February 2, 2017


Privacy, Surveillance and Censorship
government isn't always on your side

Kenyan flag and map


Kenyan president Uhuru Kenyatta has promised to arrest anyone who plans chaos in response to this year’s general elections. “I will not allow anyone in Kenya to lose their lives or property because of elections again. The government will legally deal with leaders planning to cause chaos,” reported Kenyatta. 

Thai flag and map 


Microsoft is enabling the Thai government to spy on its citizens, says Privacy International. Unlike other operating systems, Microsoft’s Windows is designed to automatically trust the Thai government’s root certificate, which in turn allows the government to install malware on websites or misrepresent websites altogether. 




Research and Initiatives
making your world a more cybersecure place

British flag and map 


Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) has hired Indian startup Spherical Defense to assist the British spy agency. Spherical Defense will monitor for hacking attempts via its Banking Intrusion Detection System. 

Brazilian flag and map 




It’s Right to Be Forgotten Week in Brazil. The event, hosted by InternetLab, strives to bring attention to an important issue that frequently goes unnoticed. Later this year, the organization will also host InternetLab School 2017, an initiative that invites journalists to explore the intersection of technology and the internet. 

New Zealand flag and map 


 Hamilton, New Zealand will host the International Standards Organisation (ISO) conference in April, which will examine the standardization of cybersecurity worldwide. The conference expects attendees from 100 countries, including experts from Interpol and the American National Security Agency. 

American flag and map 



United States-based National Cyber Security Alliance celebrated Data Privacy Day on January 28. The international celebration focused on Respecting Privacy, Safeguarding Data and Enabling Trust. 





Cyberattacks
the threats we all face

Russian flag and map 

Ruslan Stoyanov, manager of Kaspersky Lab’s computer incidents investigations unit, has been arrested for hacking. The Russian is accused of treason and is under investigation for actions committed prior to joining Kaspersky Lab. 






All images credit of BOLDG/Shutterstock.com.
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